One Healthy (or not so much) Paris Recap

Travel does wonders for the mind and soul, especially traveling to Paris! Here’s a quick recap of our trip along with some healthy tidbits we can all learn from the Parisians.

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Say this three times fast: fresh French food. Food is fresh in France. Whether it’s fish, fruit, veggies, meat, bread, or wine, fresh and locally made is the standard. You can taste the difference, from the simplest salad to a baguette to a gourmet meal.

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Restaurant menus change often because seasonal goods are preferred and expected. Everything is less processed. Interestingly, people sensitive to gluten or dairy often don’t feel the effects abroad, which leads us to believe that it may actually be the processing and not the food itself.

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During the cooking class we took, the first 90 minutes was dedicated to walking through the market, the butcher, the cheese vendor, and the fish market, seeking the freshest of fresh, which included dover sole, asparagus, tomatoes, and the herbs in the vinaigrette.

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As a nutritionist, I often encourage clients to grocery shop with a list; having a strategy as to avoid extras like Oreos sneaking into the cart. Interestingly, the people of Paris shop for groceries almost every day. Instead of stocking up on bulk items, they tend to buy just what they need for that nights’ meal, every day. Less freezing, thawing, bulking, and money. Smart.

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Regulations on meat and poultry are also more specific and there are simply no antibiotics or GMOs allowed…at all. Again, smart. As for wine,  there’s a push for biodynamic/organic wine, made without sulfates or chemicals. The wine tastes cleaner, goes down smoother, and doesn’t result in a headache or hangover the following day. Super smart.

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Being that we live in such a young country, it’s amazing to see such extensive history, like the palace of Versailles. Paris exemplifies the statement “worth the wait.” From the architecture to the wine and cheese, Paris is about the end result, not instant gratification.

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Cheese and refined sugar. Two things I rarely indulge in, but vacation (especially Paris!) calls for  complete indulgence. And with that, it’s time to get back on track with all things green.

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Last note: one thing we’ve far surpassed is our incidence of smoking. Ew. But if sitting is the new smoking, all of the walking around the beautiful city may just cancel it out? Definitely not promoting smoking – less smoking, more walking. And remember, Paris is always a good idea.

One Healthy Breakdown: travel, learn, drink, and eat your way around the world!

 

Run 10 FEED 10 Recap

The FEED Foundation, started by Lauren Bush Lauren, aids world hunger and malnutrition in a creative, powerful, and trend-setting way. Over seventy five million meals have been provided through sales of FEED’s signature artisan products (bags, t-shirts, jewelery, etc.) Buyers can feel good about purchasing great products that support an even better cause, providing adequate nutrition for those in need. Good products that FEED the world, check them out here!

photo 3I learned about FEED Projects through Women’sHealth Magazine’s Run 10 Feed 10 Campaign, a series of 10k races to fund domestic hunger. Each registration fee FEEDS 10 meals to those in need right in your own ‘backyard.’ Food is available; however, it is unfortunately not accessible to everyone. FEED Projects, in collaboration with Women’sHealth Magazine, is out to make change, one meal at a time, one bag at a time, one runner at a time.

I’m eager to spread the word about Run 10 Feed 10 because this fabulous campaign combines all good things One Healthy Hamptons loves to support: women’s health, fitness, aiding hunger, running, celebrating, and more! Every summer, Women’sHealth Magazine heads out east for a weekend celebration packed with fitness and fun in preparation for NYC’s Run 10 Feed 10 race on Sunday, September 21st. Register today!

picstitch(21)*Pictured above with Lindsey & Casey from Women’sHealth and friend Alicia

We kicked off “Women’sHealth covers the Hamptons” weekend with a great Flywheel class on Saturday morning before the celebrations commenced. And celebrate we did, at the Run 10 Feed 10 “Party Under the Stars.” There’s nothing better than celebrating a great cause with like-minded, inspirational people…Hamptons style of course!

picstitch(22)*Pictured above with friends Kristy & Marisa, B-School founder/entrepreneur Marie Forleo, and The FEED Foundation’s Lauren Bush Lauren

One Healthy Breakdown: run for a cause, shop for a cause, celebrate for a cause.

Flourishing Through Food with Tapp Francke

It was 12:29pm when Tapp Francke (local registered nutrition counselor and founder of TappsTips.com) and I realized that our one-hour session had run a little longer than planned…by 29 minutes to be exact. I have a feeling I’m not the only one who can’t get enough of Tapp’s wealth of knowledge on all things food.

me with breakfast shakeSkilled artist and photographer, Tapp Francke’s journey into nutrition counseling began while pregnant with baby #1. Her desire to contain baby innocence lead to a search for “pure” baby products. After examining countless labels, (at the health food store, mind you) Tapp concluded that there weren’t any “pure” baby foods on the market that met her standards. As a loving first-time mother, she wasn’t about to feed her perfectly healthy baby something she wouldn’t even eat herself. And so her journey began with making her own baby food. When her baby grew, so did her curiosity and she went back to school to learn how to empower herself, her family, and others to flourish through food. Now, Tapp balances life as a nutritionist, artist, mom of two, wife, and chef for her clients and family. While she wears many hats daily, talking to Tapp is surprisingly calming, soothing, and totally intriguing (hence those extra 29 minutes.)

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My convo with Tapp kicked off with normal bodily functions. First things first – I gave a run-down of a typical day in my diet. Though I was expecting critiques throughout, Tapp’s response was instead: “and how are you feeling?” Life’s everyday processes, as Tapp states, are the “basis of health.” If your body is running smoothly, you’re probably fueling it right. If not, you’re probably not.

How refreshingly simple is that? Tapp’s mission is to spread awareness, most of all, that we should not put up with life as we know it. Most people live day-to-day feeling mediocure, blah, tired, sick, bloated, moody, in pain, etc. Instead of putting up with it, we can find out why we feel less than perfect and change! Tapp’s mission is simply to help people feel their best day after day. If we learn to fuel and heal our body naturally, like Tapp and her family do, we too can flourish through food.

In order to do so, it takes some “digging,” a process Tapp associates with the job of a detective. Once Tapp gathers all of the facts from a client about their diet and bodily processes, together, they follow the clues, eliminate the mysteries, and pinpoint the ‘culprit.’ There’s no better way to identify our sensitivities than to rid them from our diet and reintroduce them with awareness of results. Case closed.

As much as I learned from Tapp about nutrition, (a LOT) the most valuable lesson was a simple, yet profound, reminder of self-awareness. Awareness of how foods make us feel, awareness that we can feel better, awareness of the power of food, the quality of the foods we choose, ingredients in our fuel, and how they affect us individually. Education is huge. Research is huge. But nothing beats awareness.

Chatting with Tapp also gave me a renewed perspective (aka awareness) on why I do what I do. Even in a world of fast food, disease, obesity, malnutrition, overmedication, contradiction, and a food & drug administration built on money, not health, Tapp remains confident and hopeful as the minority. Although we can’t change the system from the top down, we can create change from the ground up through word of mouth and spreading awareness, individual to individual. Not only is it the goal of One Healthy Hamptons to spread health throughout the Hamptons, motivate and connect people, but also to encourage YOU to create small windows of change. Creating change throughout small groups and communities is what adds up to larger transformations. Together, we’re pretty powerful, huh?! What can you do? Be self-aware and spread the word of health. Tell someone you know about One Healthy Hamptons, try out Tapp’s nutritious recipes, or better yet, chat with her yourself – just email Tapp@tappstips.com to set up a consultation. Trust me, you’ll learn…a LOT!

One Healthy Breakdown: Thanks, Tapp, for being an amazing Hamptons resource and reminding me of these simple super powers. And thank YOU. If you’re reading this, you most likely care too and you will be part of a healthier future.

Get Happier with Gretchen Rubin

Thanks to the CWBC, (Council for Women of Boston College) I got the opportunity to attend “Happiness Beyond the Heights” in NYC last week. We learned all about happiness first-hand from Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project & Happier at Home. You guys know that I am ALL about happiness, so I am so intrigued to learn about happiness in a concrete way from someone who has made a career from studying the subject.

photo(109)Gretchen began by clarifying that happiness is a difficult concept to define, measure, and substantiate; therefor, she prefers the use of the word “happier.” Regardless of our circumstances and how happy we are now, most people can relate to wanting to be happier. It also must be known that being happier involves change and personal growth. (Aka you can’t change anyone but yourself, so if you’re hopping on the happier train, get ready to focus on YOU!)

Young Woman Bending Down and Smiling with Arms Stretched BackAs I learned watching The Happy Movie, 50% of our happiness is determined by genetics, 10% by life circumstances, and 40% is controlled by our intentions.

One of my favorite of Gretchen’s many happy lessons is that happy people are helpful people. For many people, wanting to be happier or taking time for ourselves may be viewed as selfish. In actuality, happy people are far more likely to turn outward and help others. Think about it: people who volunteer, people who are charitable, people who are generous, those who offer to help you out, or do something to make you smile because they sense that you need it – these are usually happy people. Less happy people are more likely to isolate themselves and less likely to seek ways to help others. As Gretchen says, “ We should be selfish if only for selfless reasons.” So, go ahead and let yourself off the hook. Make time for what makes you happy and chock it up to doing a selfless deed, knowing that making others happier makes us even happier. Happiness is contagious. Happiness is a growing cycle. Do good, feel good. Give and you shall receive. Imagine if the world was run by happiness experts?

Gretchen gave us some other great happiness tips I’m excited to share about boosting personal happiness (which, we now know boosts the happiness of those around us too!) Gretchen’s first two simple checklist items for being happier include sleep (7-8 hours, it’s non-negotiable) and daily exercise (even 10-20 minutes is enough to get the endorphins rolling and best if outside in the sunlight). Personally, I struggle to get enough sleep, but I’m committed to making sleep a priority and you guys know I’m big on the exercise thing. Regardless of your fitness level, just get moving everyday. It’s been scientifically proven to boost happiness.

Gretchen advocates for focusing on the value of smell. All our senses can give us pleasure in different ways, but Gretchen explained that smell doesn’t take much time, effort, or money. While fresh baked chocolate chip cookies give us pleasure, the indulgence comes at the cost of calories, and baking them also takes up some time. A shopping spree sure gives us pleasure, but (cha-ching) comes at a financial cost. Also expensive and time-consuming, getting a massage to satisfy the pleasure of touch. Smell is fleeting, it does not take our time, money, or effort to appreciate a delightful smell. While you can buy a candle or perfume you love and indulge in that smell, it’s also about noticing the wonderful smells around us. I would also argue that music is an affordable sense that comes at little cost and little extra time. Hearing a song you love definitely boosts happiness, so give yourself the gifts of music and scent daily. It’s really about finding things that come at little cost to you, but really boost your happiness (ie: hot baths, a good book or magazine, cup of tea, favorite TV show, craft of choice, etc.)

Another of Gretchen’s philosophies: outer order contributes to inner peace. Lots of us feel that organization calms us. Whether it’s the coat closet, our desk, library, bedroom, etc., maintaining order on the outside will help us feel better, calmer, and clearer on the inside. It’s true, as much as I hate to clean, it always makes me feel renewed after a good tidying. Gretchen’s requirements for holding onto ‘stuff’ are; I either need it, use it, or love it. If none of the three, get rid of it. Wow, I really need to clean out my closet with those conditions…(and if you know me at all, no need to confirm that realization…I’m on it…)

It’s not all about purging “stuff;” it’s about value. Happiness has been shown not to be correlated to possessions or a lack thereof, but more to a value for what we do have. Gretchen recommends creating a shine for the possessions we love. For her, it was children’s literature. Instead of her collection being scattered around the house, she put it all in one spot and coordinated it so that it feels special now, that spot is dedicated to her children’s literature collection. It’s not about adding to a collection and needing more, more, more, it’s about treating possessions we value with value.

Lastly, anyone who has studied the concept of happiness will agree that the key to happiness is relationships. Happy people have happy relationships. Happy relationships make us happy. Happy people make for happier relationships. There’s that cycle again. Again, boosting happiness involves personal growth, meaning we cannot change others, what they do, or how they treat us, even if that contributes to unhappiness. What we can do, though, is change the way we react to others or set precedents with our own change-making actions. If you change yourself, dynamics within the relationship change and most likely, you’ll feel that the other person has changed for the better as well. If you want to improve your relationships, improve you. If you want to be happier, focus on building positive relationships.

Man and a Woman with Their Heads Together SmilingOne Healthy Breakdown: Whether you’re up for a complete happiness revamp or you’re curious to know more about The Happiness Project, pick up the book or check out gretchenrubin.com today! And another thanks to the CWBC for hosting this happy event…go BC Grad School of Social Work! Have to shout-out to my alma mater!)

Healthy Child Healthy WORLD

photo 5When Healthy Child Healthy World hosts a luncheon in the Hamptons, I become a lady who lunches for sure. Healthy Child is a non-profit that brings companies and communities together for collective advocacy for a healthier, safer world for generations to come. Healthy Child Healthy World was founded by James and Nancy Chuda, who lost their daughter to cancer linked to pesticide exposure in utero, a tragedy that could have been prevented. Did you know that 60% of what is applied to our skin topically is absorbed in the bloodstream? Everything we breath and touch has an effect on our health as well as our kid’s health. Gigi Lee Chang, the CEO of Healthy Child Healthy World, put it best: children make up 25% of our population and 100% of our future.

photo 4Sadly, this will be the first generation of kids not to live longer than their parents due to toxicity, obesity, and genetically engineered food. The mission to reverse this awful realization unites people all over the country. Today, I lunched with Gary Hirshberg of Stonyfield Farms, Gigi Lee Chang of Healthy Child Healthy World, Tiffani Theissen, (yes, Saved by the Bell) and LOTS of fabulous and interesting women, all of whom share a genuine value for making the world a healthier place. Who can’t get behind that?

The day was beautiful and the setting was perfect. Of course, the food was delicious and nutritious: kale salad, red quinoa, black bean burgers, salmon, corn, and Chloe’s Soft Serve Fruit for dessert. YUM. During lunch, we listened to an interesting panel discussion from Gary Hirshberg, Gregg Renfrew of Beautycounter, Robin Wilson of Healthy Space Interior Design, Dr. Richard Ash, The Ash Center, and Christina Anderson of Elizabeth Street. The point driven home is that we wrongly assume, as Americans, that when we shop, whether it’s at the grocery store, a high-end department store, pharmacy, or even farmer’s market, what we purchase is safe. From food to makeup, household cleaning products, sunscreen, clothing, etc. Unfortunately, our system is not built upon preventative healthcare, so our industry standards are sadly sub-par. Doctors are trained to fix health problems, not to prevent them. Until this changes, that’s where we come in.

While the mission of making the world a healthier, safer place, both today and in the future, seems totally overwhelming on a personal level, we can do our part. Gary Hirshberg was refreshingly insistent on making small changes. Collectively, this adds up. Don’t be overwhelmed if you can’t buy all organic foods, but do what you can. Buying organic is not only a step towards better health, it’s a step in the right direction for our progress as a nation. Each and every purchase made in the United States speaks volumes for our future. The things we choose to buy sends out the message that we prefer and support that product, that store, that brand. Buying organic, whole foods gives society a  ‘yes’ that what we want is healthy food. In turn, each time we buy fast or processed food, we’re sending out the message that we support our current food industry. While many argue, myself included, that the price of local, fresh, unprocessed food is expensive, in the long run, we are investing in our future. Eventually, enough “votes” for real food will lower pricing. Increased demand forces a bigger supply. Simply put, we vote with our wallet, so one thing you can do is to use your vote for good.

If we want to make the world a healthier, safer place, it’s time to start making small changes, taking baby steps. This all starts with education. We’ve got to educate ourselves because we can’t really trust our current food, medical, or pharmaceutical industries. We must continue to research for ourselves, because things are constantly changing and new information is released daily. If you want to learn something new today, check out Healthy Child Healthy World. If you feel strongly about demanding the labeling of genetically engineered foods, check out Gary Hirshberg’s movement JustLabelIt.org and sign the petition to let those running your state, and our country, that food labeling is important. What else can we do? One suggestion, something we can all easily do is to take our shoes off upon entering the house, our own home and others. 85% of pesticides found in the home are brought in on the bottoms of our shoes. Another was starting with a nylon, instead of vinyl, shower curtain, and replace household cleaners with natural products next time you run out. Basically, just start reading labels and be more aware of what you’re putting inside your home, and your body.

In fact, if you take action today, in some way, (whether it’s doing five minutes of research on the web, leaving those shoes at the door, purchasing organic produce, or just pledging to become more aware) you could win a Weleda Body Wash and Body Lotion Kit! Weleda’s products are certified 100% natural and the first ingredient is water. If you’d like this Weleda revitalizing kit, just let us know in a Facebook comment on One Healthy Hamptons’ Facebook page with one way you already or plan to make a small change towards a healthier world. All comments will be considered and winner will be picked Monday, August 26th at noon via Random.org.

photo(85)One Healthy Breakdown: The U.S. is one of the only developed countries that does not require the labeling of genetically engineered foods. That fact alone is enough to get educated today.