What’s in Season? Fall’s Best

Wondering what foods are in season…other than apples and pumpkin?! Simply head to the farm stand to see what’s fresh and local or look for items on the list below, as eating with the season is always the way to go. Here’s your fall grocery list – grow, pick, buy, cook, and enjoy!

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  • apples
  • pears
  • broccoli
  • squash
  • pumpkin
  • sweet potatoes
  • herbs
  • eggplant
  • brussles sprouts
  • arugula
  • kale
  • beets
  • pomegranates
  • figs
  • grapes
  • cabbage
  • peppers
  • green beans

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One Healthy Breakdown: eat fresh, eat local, eat well, at F A L L !

Pomegranates are in Season! Do You Know The Pom Trick?!

picstitch(13) LOVE me some pom! Pomegranates are now in season and these juicy red fruits are just as sweet on nutrition as they are on taste! Pomegranate, which protects against heart disease and cancer, is full of phytochemical compounds. The juice and seeds are the edible parts of the pomegranate fruit, both of which are packed with nutrients. A cup of pomegranate juice actually has more antioxidants than blueberries, cranberries, green tea, and red wine!

The seeds are the best part. So juicy, crunchy, sweet, and refreshing! But, do you know the trick?! It’s virtually impossible to get these little buggers out of the fruit without getting bright red juice pretty much everywhere. But there is a way! Just cut the pomegranate in half and immerse in water. Pull apart the fruit within the water to avoid the mess. The seeds will sink to the bottom while the debris will float, remove as much of the skin and white debris as possible (it’s edible, just bitter!) Strain the seeds and enjoy! Pomegranate seeds are amazingly tasty alone, in a salad, in a parfait, and even as a healthy ice cream topping!

One Healthy Breakdown: these healthy, fruity seeds are worth the work!

Blueberries, Blueberries, Blueberries

Happy National Blueberry Month!

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Let’s talk blueberries! These phytonutrient superfruits are delicious, nutritious, and easy to include into your diet. Blueberries have are packed with antioxidants, more so than most other fruits, veggies, spices, and seasonings. They also contain a high amount of vitamin K for bone strength, vitamin C, fiber, and manganese. Blueberries are low-calorie, (one cup has less than 100 calories!) low on the glycemic index, and have been shown to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. These antioxidants benefit the nervous system, mental health, memory, and have even been proven to slow down or postpone age-related cognition deterioration.

As if you need another reason, these little berries are also associated with better cardiovascular health and eye health. Eating blueberries regularly has even been connected to preventing breast cancer, colon cancer, esophageal cancer, and cancers of the small intestine.

How to eat blueberries:

– go organic when possible

– snack on them raw

– add to yogurt or cottage cheese

– freeze for a refreshing summer treat

– use frozen or fresh in smoothies

– crush and add to ice water

– bake in muffins, pies, pancakes, etc.

Click here for some healthy blueberry recipes via Pinterest!

One Healthy Breakdown: snack on blueberries year round for their nutritional makeup, but feel free to go blue-crazy in the summer while they’re in season!

Papaya “Fruit of the Angels”

If you haven’t tried papaya or made it a staple in your house, you’re missing out. Papaya’s been known for centuries as both the “fruit of angels” and the “tree of life.” Although papaya is available year-round, early summer is a peak time for this vibrant fruit. Papaya is jam-packed with nutrients, flavor, and color, it’s definitely a superfood. This fruit is light, refreshing, perfectly sweet, low-cal, and one of nature’s best offerings.

Papaya is rich in nutrients, antioxidants, vitamins, healthy enzymes, and minerals. The combination of papaya’s vast nutrients  protect against colon cancer, heart disease, osteoperosis, age-related sight loss, rheumatoid arthritis, morning sickness, and even the common cold and flu by aiding the immune system. It’s also great for the skin and has lots of anti-aging benefits.

Half a papaya only has about 50-80 calories and it’s a sizable snack. Choose a papaya that has a yellow or orange skin and feels a bit soft to the touch.  Papaya is best known for its contribution to digestive health. People pay lots of $ mula for papaya extract, it’s even known to debloat! To me, they’re missing the best part – eating the fruit!

One Healthy Breakdown: the superfood that helps to digest more food? Papaya me please!

All About the Dandelion: Facts & Recipe

Spring has sprung here in the Hamptons and this seasonal green is at its peak. Loaded with calcium, iron, other minerals, antioxidants, vitamins A, C, B’s, E, and K, this one’s jam-packed with goodness! Not only does dandelion have more protein than spinach, it also contains all essential amino acids, making it a (very low-cal) complete protein. Dandelion is a great green for cleansing or detoxing, as it aids digestion and revitalizes the liver. Dandelion’s long array of nutrients reduces the risk of cancer, diabetes, MS, cataracts, and stroke, and may even help with asthma symptoms. Enjoy dandelion greens sautéed, or, to maintain all of these healthy nutrients, raw in a green smoothie, or as the main ingredient in a fresh salad.

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While the superior health benefits of dandelion greens set it apart, so does the uniquely bitter taste. Thankfully, The Good Bowl has provided us with the perfect dandelion green recipe, so savor the taste and the health benefits. Bon Appetit!

This salad dresses the raw greens with garlic and a few sweet notes to balance the bitterness. Add some goat cheese and you’ve just made a delicious, nutrient-packed lunch right out of your back yard. Not bad for a weed.

THE GOOD BOWL’S DANDELION GREENS WITH WARM GARLIC DRESSING: (serves two)

Ingredients:
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
3 large cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 cup raisins
1 tablespoon champagne or sherry vinegar
1/2 teaspoon agave or honey
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
dandelion greens, tender leaves removed from any tough stems (about 2 cups, loosely packed)
goat cheese

In a medium skillet over medium-low heat, warm the oil and cook the garlic until it just begins to take on color. Add the raisins and stir for one minute until the garlic is lightly golden and the raisins are plump. Remove from heat and stir in the vinegar, agave, salt and pepper. Distribute the dandelion greens onto serving plates, top with goat cheese and pour the warm dressing over the top.

One Healthy Breakdown: Dandelion won me over – getting my hands on these bad boys as soon as possible – if not sooner!
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